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Posts Tagged ‘donut’

January 13, 2018

Up, Down, On, Off

9:35 am - Posted by Gregg

Now that we’re further into January (AKA a most popular month for dieting), I’m reminded of a disturbing trend in the billion dollar diet industry—albeit one that has been pervasive for years. I refer to it as the “Light Switch Mentality” that’s being sold by many organizations, programs, books and so-called experts who proclaim that to lose excess weight, you (we) should be on a diet. But this kind of thinking often leads to the opposite of being on… Being off.

Certainly being on or off has become part of the dieting vernacular. But in my humble opinion, it’s a way of thinking that can potentially lead to more weight gain than weight loss. In fact, it’s while many of us with a dieter’s mentality are on our diets that we’re focused on when we plan on going off. It’s a mindset we’ve been sold as the way to success, when in reality, it can be the way to put on extra pounds.

As someone who started gaining excess weight around first grade, and whose parents immediately took me to a doctor who put me on a strict diet (yes, even at a very young age), I can attest to the fact that the on/off cycle contributed to my continuing to gain weight throughout my youth. Sure, I would take off a few pounds (when I was on). But then I would gain even more weight back (when I was off). By the time I graduated from college, I was clocking in at over 450 pounds. And this was after years and years of constant dieting—the very thing that was supposed to be helping me was actually doing more harm than good.

Thankfully, I was able to remove myself from this cycle after my home electronic scale started reading “ERR” (its internal code for error, since it was not programmed to register any weight above 400 pounds). It’s when I stopped thinking of “dieting” (and being on and off of one) and started embracing healthy eating that I began to make some real headway. Within a year’s time I had dropped most of my excess weight. And sure, I yo-yoed up and down the scale for a couple years after that. I was, after all, recovering from a lifetime of “on and off” behavior. But once I nailed it (reaching a healthy weight for my height and body frame), I’ve stayed at this weight for well over a decade.

But this is where I quickly bring up that damned light switch thinking again. Because many people who see my before pictures want to know my secret to losing over 250 pounds of excess weight without any kind of surgery or medication. They’re not too thrilled when I tell them the secrets are eating less, moving more, getting plenty of sleep and drinking enough water (AKA common sense). And they sometimes go onto register abject horror when I tell them I have to keep all of these mandates in mind even today (otherwise right back up the scale I’d go).

Successfully losing excess weight has nothing to do with a light switch. There’s never a time that we should be on or off. If we’re prone to gaining weight or if we choose to lose excess weight to benefit our mental and physical health, then it’s going to take some work. This doesn’t mean food plans can’t be extremely helpful. But whether we choose to have a salad for lunch or even if we opt to have some ice cream for dessert, we’ve got to always think about portion size and ingredient content (yes, even when it comes to the salad).

This doesn’t have to mean we are always on and never off. Instead, we can adopt new mindsets and start living life as healthy minded individuals. You know—like those those fantastical types who can eat half a donut and then declare they’re full. (Yes, even I’m dumbfounded by this kind of behavior to this day.) But what these people know that we do not, is that they can have another donut (or whatever) in due time. But those of us on the endless on/off cycle of dieting often think, “I will be on my diet tomorrow (or Monday or come January 1st),” so I better have eighteen donuts today.

OnOff. Not always helpful.

Healthy thinking. A move in the right direction.

And healthy thinking can include well made (meaning clean ingredient) treats that can be easily and moderately worked into our eating plans—whether we’re taking off excess pounds or simply maintaining a healthy body weight.

Although somewhat baffling, this can be triumphant news if we allow it to be. Thinking less of on and off can mean reduced shame and self-punishment (also part of many dieting cycles, mentally speaking). Fact is, you are beautiful at your current weight (inside and out). If you choose to get healthier and drop some of the excess weight, then do so in a fashion that embraces all that life has to offer and try leaving the on/off Light Switch Mentality behind.

At the risk of an eye roll or two, what do you have to lose?

Photo Source: Zazzle

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12:35 pm - Posted by Gregg

Why Dieting Can Be A Turnoff JustStopEatingSoMuch.com

Recently I’ve been reminded of a disturbing trend in the billion dollar diet industry—albeit one that has been pervasive for years. I refer to it as the “Light Switch Mentality” that’s being sold by many organizations, programs, books and so-called experts who proclaim that to lose excess weight, you (we) should be on a diet. But this kind of thinking often leads to the opposite of being on… Being off.

Certainly being on or off has become part of the dieting vernacular. But in my humble opinion, it’s a way of thinking that can potentially lead to more weight gain than weight loss. In fact, it’s while many of us with a dieter’s mentality are on our diets that we’re focused on when we plan on going off. It’s a mindset we’ve been sold as the way to success, when in reality, it can be the way to put on extra pounds.

As someone who started gaining excess weight around first grade, and whose parents immediately took me to a doctor who put me on a strict diet (yes, even at a very young age), I can attest to the fact that the on/off cycle contributed to my continuing to gain weight throughout my youth. Sure, I would take off a few pounds (when I was on). But then I would gain even more weight back (when I was off). By the time I graduated from college, I was clocking in at over 450 pounds. And this was after years and years of constant dieting—the very thing that was supposed to be helping me was actually doing more harm than good.

Thankfully, I was able to remove myself from this cycle after my home electronic scale started reading “ERR” (its internal code for error, since it was not programmed to register any weight above 400 pounds). It’s when I stopped thinking of “dieting” (and being on and off of one) and started embracing healthy eating that I began to make some real headway. Within a year’s time I had dropped most of my excess weight. And sure, I yo-yoed up and down the scale for a couple years after that. I was, after all, recovering from a lifetime of “on and off” behavior. But once I nailed it (reaching a healthy weight for my height and body frame), I’ve stayed at this weight for well over a decade.

But this is where I quickly bring up that damned light switch thinking again. Because many people who see my before pictures want to know my secret to losing over 250 pounds of excess weight without any kind of surgery or medication. They’re not too thrilled when I tell them the secrets are eating less, moving more, getting plenty of sleep and drinking enough water (AKA common sense). And they sometimes go onto register abject horror when I tell them I have to keep all of these mandates in mind even today (otherwise right back up the scale I’d go).

Successfully losing excess weight has nothing to do with a light switch. There’s never a time that we should be on or off. If we’re prone to gaining weight or if we choose to lose excess weight to benefit our mental and physical health, then it’s going to take some work. This doesn’t mean food plans can’t be extremely helpful. But whether we choose to have a salad for lunch or even if we opt to have some ice cream for dessert, we’ve got to always think about portion size and ingredient content (yes, even when it comes to the salad).

This doesn’t have to mean we are always on and never off. Instead, we can adopt new mindsets and start living life as healthy minded individuals. You know—like those those fantastical types who can eat half a donut and then declare they’re full. (Yes, even I’m dumbfounded by this kind of behavior to this day.) But what these people know that we do not, is that they can have another donut (or whatever) in due time. But those of us on the endless on/off cycle of dieting often think, “I will be on my diet tomorrow (or Monday or come January 1st),” so I better have eighteen donuts today.

On. Off. Not always helpful.

Healthy thinking. A move in the right direction.

And healthy thinking can include well made (meaning clean ingredient) treats that can be easily and moderately worked into our eating plans—whether we’re taking off excess pounds or simply maintaining a healthy body weight.

Although somewhat baffling, this can be triumphant news if we allow it to be. Thinking less of on and off can mean reduced shame and self-punishment (also part of many dieting cycles, mentally speaking). Fact is, you are beautiful at your current weight (inside and out). If you choose to get healthier and drop some of the excess weight, then do so in a fashion that embraces all that life has to offer and try leaving the on/off Light Switch Mentality behind.

At the risk of an eye roll or two, what do you have to lose?

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July 15, 2014

Bite this, not that

12:47 pm - Posted by Gregg

I’m not one to vent. Or to rant. But every now and then I see something in the media that really burns my britches. This very thing happened recently one morning while watching Good Morning America. During the broadcast, they aired a story featuring “America’s get-real nutritionist” who was putting down healthier foods based solely on their calorie count. While giving her advice, Rachel Beller (author of the book Eat to Lose, Eat to Win) barely mentioned the nutrient content, fullness factor or overall wellness effects of the foods she was warning dieters about.

Sure, the message of the piece was portion control, which is always a great reminder for us all (myself included). But for Ms. Beller to insinuate her girlfriends were bad examples after seeing them at a party having two glasses of potentially beneficial red wine based on the “fact” that having two glasses of red wine the same as having two candy bars is just ridonkulous when you consider the nutritional value of the two and what your body can potentially do thanks to those “calories.” Luckily, one of the GMA anchors, Dan Harris, pointed this out at the end of the segment. But still…by then the damage was done to many of us with a dieter’s mentality.

Too often books like Eat This, Not That (also occasionally featured on Good Morning America), show off a large amount of donuts as being the calorie equivalent of something that’s healthier and better for you. I know the goal is to sell books and get into the news. But this is part of the reason that America is getting fatter and fatter. We’re being fed misleading messages that derail our efforts to not only look better on the outside, but feel better (and be healthier) on the inside.

Avocado, raw nuts and red wine can all be very good for us when consumed in moderation. Is there fat in the Avocado? Sure. Are there calories in the nuts? Of course. Should red wine be consumed in moderation if okayed by your doctor? Naturally. But to compare these foods to donuts and candy bars as being the same amount of calories is really misleading and even potentially dangerous.

There’s no rocket science required for losing weight and getting healthy. All together now: Eat less. Move more. Drink plenty of water. And get lots of sleep. And be sure to include delicious, natural and unprocessed treats from nature in your diet whenever possible. And P.S. This isn’t to say you can’t enjoy a candy bar or even a donut every now and then — but I suggest not doing it at the expense of some of nature’s (key word) healthier choices.

Common sense. Sounds so crazy it just might work!

(Have there been any recent diet or health stories that have left you frustrated? If so, tell me all about in the comments section below. Together, we can take off a little steam!)

Photo Source: Good Morning America

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February 20, 2013

King of denial

10:29 am - Posted by Gregg

It’s no secret that New Jersey governor Chris Christie is fighting the Battle of the Bulge (and doing so rather unsuccessfully to date). So when he recently appeared onThe Late Show with David Letterman eating a donut, he was applauded for beating his critics to the punch. By addressing his weight issue on humorous terms, he not only made light of the subject, but also made several headlines the next day (not a bad move for a potential 2016 presidential candidate).

But soon after Christie’s appearance, his health was questioned by former White House doctor Connie Mariano (who had, in fact, helped Bill Clinton to shed 30 pounds back in the day). Mariano voiced concern about Christie’s health — even going as far to say that she would worry about him suffering a heart attack if he were in the White House.

And suddenly, the joke (and Christie’s own sense of humor on the subject) was over. Instead of addressing Mariano’s concerns in a healthy (debate) kind of way, Christie fired back, making himself out to be a victim (in that his children had heard Mariano’s comments and had come to him out of concern) and even going as far as to publicly tell Mariana to (and yes, I’m quoting), “Shut up.”

What happened to Christie’s goofy, fun loving, donut eating persona?

As a former obese man (who weighed north of 450 pounds), I can relate to the governor’s tactics to stay ahead of the criitics by making fun of one’s self before anyone else does. I had a whole calvacade of go-to jokes that I could pull out anytime in order to put strangers at ease. I had a routine involving wicker furniture that would leave people laughing in the aisles. I understood that my being morbidly obese was a sometimes uncomfortable situation for people to deal with (mentally). Thus, I also knew that by bringing up the topic in a humorous way (as Christie did when appearing on The Late Show), I could allow my girth to be acknowledged and, therefore, let peoples’ attention to turn to other topics. But unlike Christie, I never lost that sense of humor.

Christie’s instant attack on Mariano tells me that he could potentially be as uncomfortable with his extreme weight as political pundits are. Fact is, Mariano brings up some very valid points. You simply cannot weigh as much as Christie does (or as much as I did) and not face severe medical implications. The fact that Christie attacked back in such a confronting way shows that he’s very insecure about this topic and that’s the matter of real concern here.

After Mariano made her comments, Christie had an excellent opportunity to continue the national discussion about obesity — both in regard to the challenges of being obese, the various prejudices obese people face and even the personal responsibility one must take to finally win that Battle of the Bulge. Instead, Christie showed that he not only suffers from a fat belly, but also, potentially, a fat head.

This doesn’t surprise me. Because being in denial of real facts is one of the things that keeps us from conquering our goals of losing weight. I remember weighing over 450 pounds and telling people, “I don’t understand why I’m so heavy… I don’t eat that much.” When, in actuality, I ate a lot and should have been in touch with exactly why I weighed as much as I did.

Time for Christie to get more in touch with reality, too. Not only for his political career and his own weight, but also his own kids (who aren’t actually being victimised by Mariano, but potentially are by possibly not having a full life with their Dad due to Christie’s own morbid obesity).

What’s your take on Christie’s donut eating stunt? Mariano’s reaction? Or Christie’s response that Mariano should, “Shut up?” I’d love to hear what you have to say, so please comment below. You can be sure I’d never suggest that you “Shut up.” Although I might suggest sharing a donut together (assuming there’s no wicker furniture around).

Photo Source: Daily News

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